Tagged: Outdoor Living

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    In many parts of the country, the weather in early spring can be a bit unpredictable—warm then cold, bright sun then rain. Able to handle the season’s ups and downs, English daisies and Hens & Chicks are two of our favorite, up-for-anything arrivals in the nursery. Read on to learn more about these beautiful and resilient botanicals that bring a welcome pop of color to the garden.

    English Daisy (Bellis perennis): In England, the English daisy is referred to as a “lawn daisy” because of its frequent (sometimes unwelcome) growth in grassy lawns. Technically a biennial, this spring-blooming flower can withstand temperatures as low as 10 degrees Fahrenheit. Offer your English daisies full sun and moist soil, and their tuft-like blooms and short, feathery petals in hues of white, pink and red will make them a colorful addition to containers or garden beds.

    Hens & Chicks (Sempervivum tectorum): Members of the wide-ranging succulent family, Hens & Chicks come in over 3,000 different varieties! Native to Europe and Africa, these succulents get their name from a tendency to propagate via offsets. The “hen” is the central plant, and the “chicks” are the propagated offspring that spread around the central “hen.” Gaining wild popularity in recent years thanks to their unique appearance and low-maintenance needs, Hens & Chicks make for hardy ground cover; they thrive in rock gardens and containers when planted in well-draining, dry soil and full-to-partial sun. Too much water will rot their moisture-rich leaves, which makes them ideal for planting in drought-prone areas. Hens & Chicks’ colors change throughout the seasons, making them a year-round delight for the garden.

    Throughout the season, our plant team highlights their freshest additions to the garden with New in the Nursery. Check in at your local store to take home these newly-arrived greens.

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  • Where We've Been: LA

    April 4, 2014

    Tags:
    Outdoor Living

    Two members of the terrain team got a splash of sun recently when they headed west to explore LA and the surrounding landscape. Graphic designer Danielle P. travelled cross-country for an engagement brunch that turned into a surprise wedding-- not even the couple's parents knew the secret! After the big event, she explored the city and nearby Newport Beach, taking a boat trip to spot sea lions, staying at LA's landmark Roosevelt Hotel, and strolling down the Walk of Fame. She also enjoyed an abundance of spring foliage at every turn, including giant tree ferns, blooming bougainvillea, and the city's iconic palm trees.

    On a separate trip, web merchandiser Melissa M. headed outside the city to Joshua Tree. Known for its rugged, desert landscape, the National Park is named for the gnarled Joshua trees-- a species of yucca-- that grow among the craggy rocks. Each tree lives for hundreds of years in the harsh climate, with some specimens reaching 1,000 years in age. After hiking through the park and spotting some daredevil tightrope walkers balancing between the rocks, Melissa returned to LA, where she visited LACMA and took in the view from the Griffith Observatory at sunset. Perched above the city, the observatory (most famous for its appearance in Rebel Without A Cause), offers panoramic views of the Hollywood sign, the LA skyline, and the Pacific Ocean.

    1, 2, 3: Joshua Tree; 4: Griffith Observatory view; 5,6: LA; 7: LACMA

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  • The Dirt | 2014 | Week no. 14

    The Dirt is our version of a weekly link roundup, where we share what's currently capturing our interest around the web. Hope you'll enjoy, and feel free to share what you're reading in the comments. We'd love to hear from you!

    A recipe roundup that celebrates spring’s best ingredients (via Serious Eats).

    31 days of flowers (via Veranda).

    A guide to one of our favorite early spring blooms (via Apartment Therapy).

    In photos: a day in the life of artist and friend of terrain Rinne Allen (via Design*Sponge).

    Beautiful citrus leads to a pair of picture-perfect recipes (via Cannelle et Vanille).

    Rustic and romantic sheds we'd love to have in our garden (via Gardenista).

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  • Among our much-anticipated spring arrivals, we’re welcoming a fresh assortment of citrus trees to the nursery. Including varieties of grapefruit, orange, lemon, and lime, our patio-sized citrus trees are between 2-3 years old, making them prime to flower in the spring and bear mouthwatering fruit in fall and winter, whether planted in a container or in the garden.

    Senior Plant Buyer Steve H. says, “Citrus trees tend to prefer temperatures that do not exceed 80 degrees or fall below about 50. They thrive in containers, so if you live in a climate that’s prone to extreme temperatures, they are best treated as a patio plant that can be brought indoors during harsher months. Citrus trees love sunshine, so place them near a south-facing window and they will flourish. During the spring, I recommend fertilizing and selective pruning, if needed. In fall, citrus plants should be cleaned, soaped, and brought inside.” Using a loam-based potting soil and a container with drainage is also essential for successful citrus cultivation. Be sure not to overwater, especially during the winter months, and increase watering as the temperatures rise. Citrus trees can bear fruit for 20+ years, making them a beautiful and delicious addition to indoor or outdoor gardens. Learn more below about the citrus you’ll find in our nursery.

    Lemon: Lemon trees tend to be hardy, bearing fruit whether grown indoors or out. They require at least 6 hours of sunlight each day and should be watered daily during the summer months. A tip for outdoor growing: choose an area where reflected heat from pavement or walls creates a warm microclimate that your lemon tree will adore!

    Orange: Native to China and India, orange trees have been cultivated in the United States since the early 1700’s. Orange trees are cold hardy to 25 degrees or lower, but if you’re planting your tree outdoors, it should be covered with burlap or a tarp when the temperatures start to drop.

    Lime: The most important thing to remember when caring for a lime tree is drainage. Never overwater or expose your lime tree to standing water, or it will begin dropping its leaves. Lime trees also need plenty of sunlight and temperatures that do not drop below about 50 degrees. Fertilize every few months with nitrogen-rich fertilizer.

    Grapefruit: Grapefruit harvest begins in early fall, when the large fruit turns yellow or gold. The longer the fruit remains on the tree, the sweeter it becomes. Provide your grapefruit tree with lots of sun, and do not prune unless weakened or dead branches need to be removed.

    Throughout the season, our plant team highlights their freshest additions to the garden with New in the Nursery. Check in at your local store to take home these newly-arrived greens.

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  • The Dirt | 2014 | Week no. 13

    The Dirt is our version of a weekly link roundup, where we share what's currently capturing our interest around the web. Hope you'll enjoy, and feel free to share what you're reading in the comments. We'd love to hear from you!

    Simple tips for sprouting new plants from cuttings (via Sunset).

    What’s your plant personality? (via Traditional Medicinals).

    Our Styer’s cafe is in good company on this list of Philly’s best interior spaces (via Philly Mag).

    Did you see the sweet, garden-inspired Google Doodle celebrating the first day of spring? (via The Washington Post). 

    We’d love to take a stroll through  this lovely and historic Dublin garden (via Gardenista).

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  • The Dirt | 2014 | week no. 10

    The Dirt is our version of a weekly link roundup, where we share what's currently capturing our interest around the web. Hope you'll enjoy, and feel free to share what you're reading in the comments. We'd love to hear from you!

    A trailing floral garland that we’d love to hang around the house (via The Kitchy Kitchen).

    A bouquet of 14 paper flowers—which would you make? (via Design*Sponge).

    This pretty and unusual Instagram is a hoot (via o8o8o8o8o8o).

    Three simple ways to make your home smell like spring (via Free People).

    A cozy winter wedding at our Glen Mills nursery (via Ruffled Blog/Lauren Fair Photography).

    We’d love to visit these “lost gardens” in the English countryside (via HomeDSGN).

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  • Just a short drive from our home base in Philadelphia, a rare, old-fashioned fernery provides a window into Victorian history. Tucked among the gardens of the Morris Arboretum, the Dorrance H. Hamilton Fernery was built in 1899, at the height of a Victorian fern craze known as "pteridomania." Garden enthusiast John T. Morris ordered a collection of over 500 plants to fill the fernery, an elegant creation of glass and steel with a graceful, curved roof. To create an optimal environment for his humidity-loving specimens, Morris turned to the latest technologies in steam heating, glass cutting, and architecture.

    Sadly, the structure fell into disrepair as enthusiasm for ferns faded during subsequent decades. In 1994, the fernery was restored to its original beauty; the curved roof was refurbished, the heating system updated, and the rocky outcroppings where ferns grow rebuilt. Today, it's the only freestanding Victorian fernery remaining in North America. Though just 53 feet long, the building holds countless tableaux, with ferns flourishing among stony pathways, gentle fountains, and hidden grottos. After more than a century, we can still see why these tropical escapes were so beloved by Victorian gardeners. 

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  • The Dirt | 2014 | week no. 9

    The Dirt is our version of a weekly link roundup, where we share what's currently capturing our interest around the web. Hope you'll enjoy, and feel free to share what you're reading in the comments. We'd love to hear from you!

    Wishing we could have joined in on this woodland adventure (via honey & jam).

    A peek into garden parties of the past (via Modern Farmer).

    A gorgeous studio tour with one of our favorite florists (via Gardenista).

    In case you missed it, a chance to win $5000 and a trip to terrain (via Remodelista).

    Looking ahead with an early spring arrangement (via Sacramento Street).

    Why not adopt a tree this spring? (via Apartment Therapy). 

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