Tagged: Our Gardens

Since early September, terrain plant buyer Karen C. has been traveling across Pennsylvania to find this season's very best pumpkins and gourds at annual pumpkin auctions. Her picks are now filling our nursery with fall color, and we stopped by Styer's earlier this week to snap the photos above. We'll be decorating, carving, and even baking with this bumper crop throughout the season. Karen shared some fun facts about a few of our favorite varieties, below.

Fairytale: A French heirloom variety, this unusual pumpkin has a deeply lobed shape and mahogany-brown hue. Weighing up to 15 pounds, its deep orange flesh is great for cooking and pie baking.

Prizewinner: Weighing up to 300 pounds, Prizewinners are sure to be a showstopper. A popular variety for giant pumpkin contests, they add a pop of vibrant red-orange in the fall garden or on the doorstep.

Casperita: These petite, white pumpkins are an ideal addition to seasonal décor thanks to their sturdy, green handles and long-lasting color.

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Living Walls for Summer

June 23, 2015

Tags:
Our Gardens
, Grow

Vertical gardening has long been a specialty for terrain Landscape’s Fine Gardening team. The team is responsible for the upkeep of the beloved living wall outside Styer’s Garden Café, pictured above, which was planted during our annual Dig into Spring Festival this April. Now lush and thriving, this leafy wall is an Instagram favorite among café goers looking to capture the quintessential terrain moment.

In preparation for the hot summer days ahead, the team also re-planted the living wall at our home office. They chose an assortment of low-maintenance, drought-tolerant botanicals, planted in 36 individual hayrack planters that are lined with faux moss fabric. “We went for a look that was a reflection of the colors used in the living wall at the café," says landscape designer Nathan T. "Large, leafy greens such as Datura and Brugmansia act as bold statements, and textured spillers like Dichondra and Helichrysum 'Limelight' add dramatic shape. Pops of purple are provided by airy verbena and pink-striped Setcreasea, while the giant, fuzzy silver Stachys adds another layer of unique color. A spreading perennial, this plant will grow furry flower stalks as the season progresses.”

Ready to plan your own garden? Learn more about our Landscape services.

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Landscape by Terrain: Spring Muscari & Magnolia

From single container gardens to multi-acre estates, the talented gardeners of Landscape by Terrain focus on elevated design and meticulously managed installation. This spring, the team is feeling inspired by container plantings like the one above, perfect for celebrating the change in seasons. Nursery manager Greg O. says, “I chose this planter for its classic styling. Its color and lines are timeless, a theme terrain is exploring in its spring outdoor furniture collection. I also like the restfulness and simplicity this monoculture of muscari brings to the senses. There's something calming about the paring of green and blue. The deciduous magnolia garland is not only soft and beautiful, but also creates a nice visual transition between the bare branches of winter and the freshness that early spring bulbs evoke.” 

Want to get the look? Greg’s planting includes muscari (grape hyacinth), budded Magnolia x soulangiana branches, and clump moss in our Low Fiberclay Urn. Place in a cool (above freezing) location and the color will radiate for weeks to come!  

Ready to get your own garden in shape for spring? Visit www.shopterrain.com/glen-mills-landscaping or call 610-459-2400. Our landscape services are currently available in the northeastern region of the United States. 

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Laura Twilley, Square Foot Gardening Watercolor, terrain
Laura Twilley, Square Foot Gardening Watercolor, terrain

 

With spring on the horizon, terrain Art Director Laura T. is planning a square foot-style, raised bed vegetable garden to cultivate throughout the summer. Ideal for maximizing space in a compact plot, the square foot method involves planting 12x12" sections of different vegetables to create a small but dense garden. This allows for ample yields and diverse crops while limiting maintenance. As she waits for planting season, Laura created the pretty painting above to organize her garden into sixteen parcels for her favorite vegetables, including some terrain picks-- Organic Galilee Spinach from California's All Good Things, and Tom Thumb Lettuce from Baker Creek Heirloom Seed Co. in Missouri. Laura says, "I love to see lots of color in the garden and, as they say, 'eat the rainbow.'” We'll be checking in throughout the seasons to see how her garden is growing. Here's what she'll be planting this spring:

 

Golden Sweet Snow Pea
Scarlet Kale 
Red Russian Kale

Organic Galilee Spinach

Tom Thumb Lettuce 
Five Color Silverbeet Swiss Chard
Mascara Lettuce

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Once located at 103-105 Arch Street in Philadelphia, the Philadelphia Seed Company was led by President and Director Clarence Neal during the 1920’s and 30’s. Who is Clarence Neal? He just happens to be the great-grandfather of terrain’s Junior Web Designer, Kelly N! Kelly shared the above mementos from Philadelphia’s horticultural past, which have been passed down in her family for generations. Read on to learn more about these historic treasures and find out how Kelly, a Baltimore native, ended up in the same city where her great-grandfather once made garden history.

Reference Book: “The Philadelphia Seed Company reference book was given to me by my grandmother. It's a three-ring binder containing information on all the seeds the company supplied each year – some of the pages date as far back as 1935! As a graphic designer, I find the typography fascinating. I often flip through it for inspiration for designs. I think it's so serendipitous that I ended up in Philadelphia working for terrain, given that my great-grandfather's roots are so strongly connected to what we do here.”

Seed Bag & Sign: “The original Quaker Field Seed bag and amazing Philadelphia Seed Co. metal sign live in Pennsylvania, just outside the city at my uncle’s home in West Chester. Even though I'm a fairly new resident to Philly, it's nice to know that I have such strong family ties to this area. I'm also completely obsessed with the design of the old seed bag!”

1920's Mailer: “My mom keeps this mailer from October 29, 1923 framed in our home in Maryland. My great-grandfather's name is listed at the top, and I love the typography. It's so interesting to see all the prices of the seeds and how many varieties they offered, from grasses and clover to potatoes and birdseed. It's also amazing to think that farmers used to mail in their orders to the Seed Company – with everything being so fast paced these days, it's nice to think back to a time when stamps were 1 cent and people corresponded for seeds via "snail mail."

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The Sunday Gardener: January Planning

“How does your garden grow?” With this question in mind, we’re sitting down with terrain’s own avid gardeners to find out what they’re digging throughout the seasons. Each month, our experts will provide their lists of essential to-do’s for spending a Sunday in the garden. First up is plant buyer Karen C., who proves that even the coldest months can be a time to grow.

Because it’s January, not much time is being spent outside, but Karen braved the elements this weekend to visit her community garden plot in Philadelphia and harvest a few leeks that she planted from seed starts last September. “While there," she says, "I reviewed my garden journal from last year. I use it to keep sketches of what, where, and when I plant things. Last year was my first year keeping the journal, and it was so helpful. Now I can reflect on what worked and what didn’t, as well as understand where to rotate types of crops every year to help with pest management. I concluded ‘yes’ to tomatoes, beans, cucumbers, spinach, kale, strawberries, radishes, and beets for the upcoming year. ‘No’ to Brussels sprouts, artichokes, and pumpkins – they just take up too much of my already limited space and I’d like to have cutting garden for the first time.”

After reviewing, Karen did a quick sketch of her ideal garden plot for this year, so that she could plan for what seeds to order. “Once home, I looked up a few leek recipes before gathering all of my scattered seed catalogs together on my nightstand. At this time of year, I read catalogs at night like they’re novels. Planning and mapping things out before placing my orders keeps me on track so I know what seeds I need. Otherwise I just buy way too much every year. I still will, but at least I’ll have a better idea!”

Karen's Sunday Garden Checklist:
1. Start a garden journal – review last year’s notes if you already have one.
2. Map out a plan for this year’s garden.
3. Buy seeds! 

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Plant a Pumpkin Patch

October 31, 2014

Tags:
Our Gardens
, Grow

Plant a Pumpkin Patch

Did you know that the heirloom pumpkins and gourds you picked out for festive decorating this fall can be used to grow your own pumpkin patch for next year’s crop? After Halloween, take your pumpkins outdoors and stow them in an out-of-sight location until they break down completely. Then, simply bury them no more than six inches deep in your garden before the first frost and cover with mulch. Throughout the winter, the fermented squash will spread their seeds in the soil, then begin to grow in the spring. Make sure you plant your pumpkins in an area with ample space, about 3-6 feet apart – they will need lots of room to spread their vines, which can grow up to 30 feet! Compost, ample fertilizer, lots of sunlight, and well-draining soil will ensure that your squash thrive. If you notice the soil getting dry, water immediately, as pumpkins are largely made up of water. However, note that overwatering can make them sickly; deep, infrequent watering yields the best result.

Our Product and Community Coordinator, Kelly S., put this method of pumpkin-growing to the test in her yard and harvested her crop from early August until late October. She says, “When the shell of your pumpkin has hardened and changed color, you’ll know it’s ready to harvest. Unfortunately, many of our pumpkins got stolen by hungry critters, so next year we plan to put up fencing and use other measures to keep pests at bay. Our favorite discovery was that the yellow flowers produced by pumpkin vines are edible – simply remove the inner parts and they’re a delicious top note on a frittata or a garnish for salads!”

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Behind the Scenes: terrain's Living Wall

For a fall event at our headquarters, terrain Landscape's Fine Gardening team created a remarkable installation-- the gorgeous Greenwall above. Transforming an unused building on our campus into a blooming focal point, we're thrilled that this beautiful garden is now a permanent part of our landscape. We recently caught up with two people who brought the wall to life, nursery manager Greg O. and plant buyer Karen C., to learn more about how the project came together.

Greg O. tells us, "terrain's Creative Director, Greg Lehmkuhl, designed the Greenwall. He envisioned a harvest wall that would be at its most colorful during the event at the end of September. It's composed of 36 individual hayrack planters, arranged in 12 rows of three. A faux moss fabric lines the baskets to hold the soil, a potting mix from Organic Mechanics. Karen did a brilliant job of choosing and sourcing the plants to be used."

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