Tagged: Grow

Specimen Guide: Succulents

July 28, 2015

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Grow

Specimen Guide: Succulents

Available in a dazzling array of shapes, sizes and colors, we firmly believe that there's a succulent variety for every space in the garden. With lots of new arrivals in our nurseries, we asked our experts-- plant buyers Steve H. and Karen C.-- to help us craft a specimen guide showcasing some new and unusual succulents. Read on to learn more about four of their favorite varieties right now.

Jovibarba hirta: Karen says, "I'm loving Jovibarba these days, and Jovibarba hirta has been a bestseller in our nursery this year! It’s a form of Hens and Chicks that's also commonly called “rollers.” Jovibarba are very similar to Sempervivum, except for how they form new "chicks." Sempervivum form new growth under the adult rosette, but Jovibarba send them up over the mother plant on brittle stems that break easily, sending the babies rolling away to find a place to root." Native to European mountain ranges including the Alps and Balkans, these hardy, rosette-shaped succulents are part of their own, very small subgenus that includes just three species.

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Whether used to create a planted chandelier or a clever cake stand, we love the versatility our Habit + Form trays provide. We're using the latest addition to the collection, a square tray finished with antiqued brass, to root succulents in a way that promotes speedy propagation, and looks pretty in the process! Read on to learn how to root your own succulents in just a few easy steps!

1. Fill the inside of the tray with Growstone Drainage Medium.

2. Pour water on top of the stones, filling the tray with just enough water to cover the bottom, forcing the succulents' roots to stretch towards it.

3. Plant cut succulents and/or succulent leaves upright among the stones. Be sure to place them deep enough so that they stay in place, but not so deep that they touch the water.

4. Place the tray in direct sunlight and watch for new growth to appear (about four to six weeks after planting), adding water as needed. Once the plants have established new roots, they can be transplanted outdoors or into pots and enjoyed!

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Have you ever received a bouquet of flowers or bought fresh cut blooms at the market and thought about where those flowers came from? In our latest installment of Notes from the Field, we’re taking a peek at life on a local flower farm during the height of summer. Specializing in “seed to centerpiece designs,” as well as workshops and a budding Plant Share program, Love 'n Fresh Flowers is not only a thriving florist, but a full-fledged flower farm as well. Owner Jennie Love will be checking in with us throughout the year to share what life on the farm is really like. Read on to learn more about what Jennie is up to this time of year!

terrain: What time did you start your day?

Jennie: This morning I woke up at 5:30 AM, so I'd have some time to write to terrain before heading to the farm for harvest!

terrain: What color is most prevalent in the fields at the moment?

Jennie: In a word, bright. Lots of vivid oranges, yellows, purples, pinks, salmons-- really, it's a crazy rainbow and truly a visual feast. 

terrain: What's blooming right now?

Jennie: Everything! It's difficult to summarize this time of year. Off the top of my head: Queen Anne's lace, scabiosa, dacus, feverfew, snapdragons, calendula, dianthus, carnations, delphinium, dill, fennel, gomphrena, zinnias, coreopsis, rudbeckia, cosmos, statice, grasses, mountain mint, hydrangeas, snowberry, sedum, dahlias, basils, monarda, lisianthus, celosia...there's so much more than that! We literally pack our giant walk-in cooler every day with the morning's harvest. There are more flowers than you can imagine!

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A High Summer Hanging Sphere

July 15, 2015

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Grow

A High Summer Hanging Sphere

Alight with sunset shades and vivid greens, the latest planting in our Sphere Hanging Basket is the perfect ode to high summer in the garden. Stylist Alli S. created this seasonal stunner, and shared the plants you'll need to get the look at home. Read on for her hanging basket recipe.

The stars of the show, Echinacea 'Sundown' and Gallardia 'Fanfare Blaze' bring warm, peachy orange tones to the planting, balanced by the saturated purples of Gomphrena 'Strawberry Fields' and Coreopsis 'Mercury Rising.' Nicotiana 'Alata' and Sedum 'Frosty Morn' add a touch of pale pink, while Euphorbia 'Ascot Rainbow' and Heuchera 'Caramel' introduce soft, golden yellows. A bright backdrop for the sunset palette, minty Artemisia 'Powis Castle' and Jasmine 'Fiona Sunrise' in bold lime complete the basket.

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Rooted in local history, a property in Swarthmore, PA proved to be one of Landscape By Terrain's most exciting projects this summer. Working to preserve and complement the historic plants that anchor the landscape, our team paired traditional touches with modern improvements for a one-of-a-kind garden. We caught up with Landscape Designer Nathan T. to learn more about the revitalization of this uniquely beautiful property and its connection to terrain history.

Nathan says, "This home was built in the late 1910's using local stone; its style is inspired by the big, traditional estates in the Philadelphia area. A member of the board at J. Franklin Styer Nurseries-- now the home of terrain at Styer's-- designed the gardens and did many of the plantings for the first owners. Our current clients really wanted to preserve the historic elements of the property, so we started by taking a plant inventory to discover what was special about the landscape. The next step was finding ways to update the existing features while staying sincere to the original design. We chose new varieties of historic plant types that were already in the gardens, then worked very gently and carefully to renovate the patio and other hardscape areas, making sure to match the stonework on the house."

"The entire property is set up to create the feeling of rooms throughout the landscape," Nathan tells us. "My favorite element is a grouping of magnolias. While it feels continuous, there are also lots of secret gardens and vistas to discover. And thanks to a backdrop of evergreens, most of the garden will have some interest throughout the year. We also incorporated plant masses, not just flowering specimens, that will enliven the landscape as the seasons change."

Ready to plan your own garden? Learn more about our Landscape services.

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New in the Nursery: Echinacea

July 9, 2015

Tags:
Grow

Commonly known as Coneflower, Echinacea purpurea is one of our favorite blooms for high summer. Recently, a fresh collection of Echinacea varieties arrived in our nursery, bringing a welcome infusion of color to our perennial selection. Native to eastern regions of North America, coneflower blooms from spring through late summer. Purple is the most common shade for its cheerful flowers, but ornamental cultivars are available in a wide variety of hues-- as evidenced by the sign above. Coneflowers prefer loamy or sandy soils in well-drained area; the hardy plants can also tolerate high summer heat and dry conditions. Echinacea derives its name from the Greek word echinos, meaning hedgehog-- a reference to the prickly scales on its seedhead.

A popular addition to cutting gardens, coneflowers are easy to dry for long-lasting arrangements. They also bring color to the garden by attracting several species of butterflies and hummingbirds. If seedheads are allowed to develop, Echinacea is self-seeding and will reappear in the garden year after year. Traditionally used by Native Americans as a "cure-all" and treatment for infections, it remains a popular herbal remedy for boosting the immune system. Visit us in Glen Mills and Westport to see which varieties are in stock for summer. 

Throughout the season, our plant team highlights their freshest additions to the garden with New in the Nursery.

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With many parts of the country facing hot, dry weather this time of year, we’re rounded up five of our favorite plants for xeriscaping. Xeriscaping is the art of landscaping with drought-tolerant flowers and foliage that bring color and beauty to the garden, while reducing the need for supplemental watering. Read on to learn more about our go-to plants for beating the heat!

Salvia (1l): With over 1,000 varieties, Salvia is the largest genus of plants in the mint family. We particularly love the ‘Victoria Blue’ and ‘Evolution’ cultivars, which feature beautiful, purple flowers during the summer. Not only drought-tolerant, Salvia can also help keep garden pests like deer and rabbits at bay.

Sedum (1r): A broad genus that includes annuals and perennials alike, Sedum are flowering plants that are predominantly leaf succulents. Because they can store lots of moisture in their leaves, they only need occasional watering. The best part? Sedum look beautiful all season long, and often maintain their green appearance through the winter months, after their flowers die back. Sedum plants thrive in full sun with well-drained soil, and make for great groundcover.

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