Tagged: Grow

The Language of Flowers

February 9, 2016

Tags:
At Home
, Grow

This Valentine's Day, we're giving new meaning to the phrase "say it with flowers" courtesy of terrain floral designer Katie B. Katie created the gorgeously colorful bouquet above using inspiration drawn from the language of flowers-- a form of hidden communication that assigns meanings to different blooms, telling a story through a bouquet. Also known as floriography, this practice reached peak popularity during the Victorian Era. Today, we still love the idea of sending a secret message to your Valentine through meaningful blooms. 

Katie told us that her bouquet shares the story of a secret admirer finally revealing his feelings. She says, "In the language of flowers, acacia symbolizes a secret love, while snapdragon indicates concealment. The addition of thistle-- a symbol of pride-- reflects confidence in long-held emotions. Aster, symbolizing patience, pairs with carnation for remembrance to suggest that the admirer has waited for just the right moment. The final three flowers complete the story with compliments and wishes for the person receiving these blooms. Orchids at the center of the bouquet symbolize the refined beauty of its recipient, while peony and eucalyptus offer hope for a happy life and protection, respectively."

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Plant Spotlight: Monstera deliciosa

February 4, 2016

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Grow

Plant Spotlight: Monstera deliciosa

A statement-sized specimen that's a consistent favorite for indoor greenery, Monstera deliciosa derives its name from a remarkable size and a tasty, though rarely-seen fruit. Native to rainforests from southern Mexico to Panama, this flowering tropical is also known as the "Swiss cheese plant." Its nickname comes from the unusually-shaped leaves shown above, which begin as a single oval and become fenestrated as they mature. The lacy leaves are a natural adaptation that helps Monstera thrive in its native habitat; open spaces let the leaves withstand intense rainfall and wind, while a large surface area collects the limited sun that filters through the rainforest canopy. Indoors, these large-scale leaves offer a burst of glossy green that's perfect for brightening an empty corner. 

At home, place your Monstera in bright, indirect light-- direct sun can cause the leaves to burn. Water weekly and be sure to prune your plant as needed by making a flat cut where the leaf or branch joins the parent stem. In the wild, Monstera can reach up to 65 feet in height, so regular trims are necessary for indoor cultivation, and a supportive stick or trellis is key for upright growth. It's rare for these tropical beauties to flower or fruit when kept inside, but dedicated gardeners could see flowers about three years after planting. The flavor of the fruit has been compared to banana and pineapple; if your plant does produce a fruit, it must be fully ripened before it's safe to eat. In the meantime, Monstera is sure to become the centerpiece of your indoor garden.

Photo by Ewen Roberts

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Low Water Plants for Winter at Home

January 25, 2016

Tags:
Grow

Images: 1. Succulents; 2l. Chinese Evergreen; 2r. Orchid; 3l. Pothos; 3r. Tillandsia

Though there's snowy weather outside our windows, we're keeping busy with indoor gardens all around the house. Seeking specimens with big impact and minimal maintenance, we caught up with plant buyer Karen C. Earlier this month, Karen shared some favorite plants that thrive in low light. This time around, she's choosing some great options for a colorful, indoor garden that requires minimal watering. Read on for her top five.

Succulents: A classic choice for easy indoor gardens, succulents come in a nearly unlimited selection of colors, shapes, and sizes. Preferring drought-like conditions and bright sunlight, they offer big impact with very little care-- try a mixed planter like the one above for an extra burst of color.

Orchids: Though often considered high-maintenance, most orchids only require watering about once a week. Check the soil periodically and water when it begins to feel dry; to avoid root rot, make sure your orchid is planted in a container with adequate drainage and never let it remain in standing water.

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3 Ways to Re-Green Your Space

January 11, 2016

Tags:
At Home
, Grow

While the garden is quiet in midwinter, we're turning our attention to indoor plants for a daily dose of green. Throughout the colder months, indoor gardens can help to purify air around the house and serve as a reminder of the seasons to come. Field Visual Director Melissa B. recently shared three of her favorite ways to re-green your space for a winter refresh. Best of all, many of these looks can be created by simply moving your existing plants to new and unexpected locations, making it easy to get green.

Gathered Greens: Create a refreshing oasis by grouping plants from around the house on a single table-- we especially love this look for an impactful entryway. Mix and match foliage types and planters for variety in color and texture; a curio-style terrarium in the midst can also provide a whimsical touch. If your plant collection is large, tuck in a few small stands to add height throughout the display.

Plants on Stands: Bring greenery to an unexpected corner of the home by elevating your favorite plants on stands. Group a few stands together to create a miniature garden, or use a single stand to add foliage in the bath for a spa-like atmosphere. 

Pairs + Scale: Place two matching planters together on stands or a console table for a stately display in spacious rooms. This look works especially well with architectural plants and vessels. Complete the look with a large-scale plant-- like the fiddle leaf fig tree above-- to brighten spaces with tall ceilings. 

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Image Credits: 1- Ferns; 2l- Sansevieria; 2r- Aralia; 3- Aglaonema; 4l- ZZ Plant; 4r- Begonia; 5- Pothos.

Low light conditions are tough for most indoor plants, especially during the short days of winter. Seeking a touch of green to enliven darker spaces around the house, we checked in with plant buyer Karen C. She says, "My favorite low light plants range in color and form, but share some common denominators for care; they shouldn't be placed in direct sunlight, overwatered, or allowed to become too dusty (the first will cause the leaves to burn, and the latter two can encourage rot and insects). Essentially, keep these specimens in low, indirect or artificial light, clean them periodically, and water only when the soil is dry. You'll have long-lasting, happy plants!"

Fern: In general, ferns are a great choice for low light conditions, and they come in many colors and growth habits. One favorite is the ruffle fern, a variety of the Boston fern with crinkly leaves that form a clump of 3-foot fronds. Another great option is the kangaroo paw fern, which sends shiny, deeply serrated fronds up from fuzzy rhizomes that lie above the surface of the soil. Kangaroo paw is perfect for a hanging basket, as it grows to just a foot tall, but spreads to around 2-3 feet wide. In its native Australia, it’s grown as groundcover. The silver ribbon fern is another good choice, with delicately arching fronds of bi-colored green and white leaves cascading up and outwards.

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Specimen Guide: Topiaries

December 3, 2015

Tags:
Grow

Specimen Guide: Topiaries

The newest arrivals in our greenhouse, fresh and sculpted topiaries are making a big impact this holiday season. Framing the doorstep, topping the mantel, or wrapped in Stargazer lights, this cultivated collection is a welcome addition to the winter home, offering long-lasting color and elegant shapes. With the simple addition of a ribbon-tied tag, they also make for the season's greenest gifts. Read on to learn more about some of our favorite topiary varieties.

Lemon Cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa): With a citrusy fragrance and lime-green foliage, this small-scale evergreen is a refreshing sight around the house. Native to the Monterey Bay region of central California, lemon cypress prefers an abundance of direct sunlight-- 6 to 8 hours a day is ideal-- and temperatures from 55-65F. Its relatively small size makes it perfect for container gardens; in the warmer months, your cypress can be moved outdoors once the danger of frost has passed.

Ivy (Hedera helix): Native to Europe and western Asia, this traditional climber takes a new shape as a conical topiary. Fast-growing and evergreen, this hardy plant can thrive in Zones 4 through 9. Indoors, it should be placed in bright light to avoid discoloration and a leggy appearance. A low-maintenance house plant, its shapely, variegated leaves add year-round interest to container gardens.

Angel Vine (Muehlenbeckia complexa): Native to New Zealand, this ornamental variety is also known as maidenhair or lacy wire vine. A vigorous, climbing habit makes it ideal for use as a topiary; keep snips on hand to maintain the shape as it grows. Delicate yet durable, angel vine is also a resilient pick for indoor gardening; it prefers bright light and evenly moist soil conditions. Its round, glossy leaves pair with dark stems for a striking color contrast.

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Last week at Styer's, members of the Philadelphia Museum of Art gathered for a cocktail hour to celebrate the museum's newest exhibition-- Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life. The centerpiece of the evening was an abundant floral still life, inspired by the exhibit and arranged by Design by Terrain's Katie Blevins. Katie and fellow designer Matt Muscarella enjoyed a guided tour at the museum to gather inspiration, then created the enchanting display above using richly-colored flowers and seasonal fruits. 

Katie says, "My arrangement was inspired by the paintings of Severin Roesen, a nineteenth-century artist recognized for his still lifes. Relatively little is known about his life, but he produced over 300 paintings while living in New York and Pennsylvania. The materials I chose for this project were based on seasonality and a color palette reminiscent of the paintings. In many of the works, the scene is dark, with an arrangement placed against a glossy, black surface to create a wonderfully reflected effect. I responded the most to these darker, moodier pieces.

"Alongside ranunculus, peonies, anemones, and other blooms in deep, saturated hues, I included sliced and whole fruits as a nod to Roesen's signature subjects. Cutting the fruit in half to reveal its natural colors and textures helped to create interest and the intentionally disheveled look I wanted to achieve. I used fresh pomegranates, persimmons, and pomegranates against a backdrop of rumpled, black linen. Along with Roesen, some of my fondest inspiration came from florists I admire. Designers like Sarah Ryhanen of Saipua, Brittany Asch of Brrch Floral, and my colleague Matt have embraced an effortless and unexpected view of the botanical world. They continue to inspire me every day."

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Give + Grow: Waxed Amaryllis Bulbs

November 16, 2015

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How-To
, Grow

Give + Grow: Waxed Amaryllis Bulbs

This year, our favorite living gift for the holidays is also the easiest to grow-- no green thumb required! Sourced from Holland's flower farms and coated in colorful wax, the amaryllis bulbs above are completely self-sustaining; they arrive ready to bloom with no need for watering or soil. We're planning to pair our bulbs with some garden staples to create one-of-a-kind gifts that are perfect for friends, neighbors, coworkers, and holiday hostesses. Read on for three of our favorite gift recipes.

1. Waxed Amaryllis Bulb + Earth Fired Clay Thin Rim Pot + Reindeer Moss + Classic Baker's Twine

2. Waxed Amaryllis Bulb + Habit + Form Circle Tray + Clump Moss + Tie-On Mushrooms + Indoor Snowflakes

3. Waxed Amaryllis Bulb + Silver Footed Plant Stand + Mercury Beads Garland + Fresh Greens

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